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The 9 Best Hip Flexor Stretches To Avoid Injury, According To Trainers

The 9 Best Hip Flexor Stretches To Avoid Injury, According To Trainers

When I was 16 and sprinting, I injured my hamstring muscle. In addition to my soccer practice sessions and games, my team participated in a lengthy hamstring prep before every game. I thought I would do just as well.

It took me 10 years and other countless hamstring injuries to comprehend what was occurring. A physical therapist mentioned tight hip flexors, not hamstrings, as the root cause.

The demands of daily life can be quite a pain in the hip flexor, says NASM-certified trainer Ellen Thompson, a fitness center. Thomson acknowledges that many people endure with tight hip flexors because they are either inactive or use their bodies too much. Those who guide others to sit for extended periods of time and those who engage in high-intensity activity that really exhausts the hip flexors are at the greatest risk for chest pain and injury.

If you're trying to figure out how to function, then this article outlines everything you should know about hip flexors, their role in your everyday movement, and a complete hip flexor stretching routine to assist you physically.

What exactly are hip flexors?

Exercises like squats often come from the lower abdominal muscles, but you rarely think of the hip flexors, which are actually the primary power behind all lower limb movements. The hip flexors include the rectus femoris, iliacus, psoas, iliocapsularis, and sartorius muscles, among others.

And, you absolutely should. These five muscles attach to the spine, ilium (upper pelvis), and femur (thigh), and are involved in all running, jumping, hinging, and even twisting movements, she says. They are also important when it comes to hip stability and core strength.

The Benefits Of Stretching Your Hip Flexors

The hip flexors do quite a bit of work for your body, and they deserve some pampering (or, stretching). If you end up seated for a long time, your psoas and iliocapsularis muscles shorten and tense, which causes an anterior pelvic tilt and increased curvature of the lower back. That uncomfortable pulling sensation occurs in the front of the hip or lower back when she stands and walks, she warns.

Individuals who are on their feet most of the day are not exempt from tight hip flexors. For those who spend most of their time on their feet, the hip flexor issue is most likely an overuse issue. If you have weak core and glutes, you're putting more stress on the hip flexor muscles.

Static Hip Flexor Stretching Routine

If hip flexor problems exist when you sit or stand, this static stretching routine from Thompson can help you. Hold these stretches each morning or after a workout, but never before exercise. Even if you don't have a goal in fitness, a hip flexor-stretching session can help you improve your mobility (including the risk of injury) throughout the day, Thompson explains.

Lying Hip Flexor Stretch

The lying hip flexor stretch is a yoga pose that is said to help lengthen the hip flexors, which are the muscles responsible for bringing the knee up towards the chest. The pose is said to be especially beneficial for runners, as it can help relieve tension in the hips and improve flexibility. The pose can be performed by lying on your back on the floor and folding one leg up towards your chest. You can use your hand to help pull your knee closer to your chest, or you can clasp your hands around your shin. Hold the pose for 30 seconds to a minute, then switch legs.
  1. Position yourself on your back with legs fully extended and arms relaxed at sides, palms neutral.
  2. Take a deep breath, draw in your abdominal area, and push back into floor while slowly pulling one knee up towards your chest.
  3. Fingertips intertwine to latch hands over the knee as it approaches the chest. Gently pull the knee closer to the chest, feeling a stretch in the hip.
  4. Maintain core tight and opposite leg fully extended for 10 to 30 seconds. Gently exhale and inhale.
  5. Gradually release the knees and ankles to the ground.
  6. Repeat on the opposite side.

Standing Hip Flexor Stretch

The standing hip flexor stretch is a simple stretch that can be done anywhere. This stretch targets the hip flexors, which are the muscles that allow you to lift your leg when you're standing. The standing hip flexor stretch is a good way to improve flexibility in this area and can help to prevent injuries.
  1. Start in a staggered stance one foot in front of the other with your hands on your hips.
  2. With the core tight, chest high, and hips squared, let the forward knee bend while slowly driving hips forward. Do not arch the back, push forward until you feel a stretch in the front of the hip.
  3. Hold for 10 to 30 seconds while keeping your core tight and alternate leg fully extended behind.
  4. Draw out your pelvic floor slowly by pulling your hips back into their original position.
  5. Repeat on the opposite side.
If you're currently pregnant or postpartum, this specific stretch of time is an especially great one for you, per Thompson.

Half Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch

The half kneeling hip flexor stretch is an easy way to improve hip mobility and prevent lower back pain. This stretch can be done with or without a band, and is a great way to warm up before a workout. To do the half kneeling hip flexor stretch, start in a half kneeling position with your left knee on the ground and your right foot in front of you. Lunge forward until you feel a stretch in your right hip flexor, then hold for 30 seconds. Repeat on the other side.
  1. Half-kneeling with one knee on the floor and other leg in front bent at 90 degrees, one's foot planted on the floor directly under the knee.
  2. With core tight, shoulders lifted, and legs squared before them, let forward knee glide forward while slowly driving hips forward until you sense a stretch at the front of your hip. Squeeze your buttocks and try to not arch your back.
  3. Hold the position for 10 to 30 seconds while firmly maintaining the core.
  4. Gradually release the stretch by returning to the starting position by pulling the hips.
  5. Repeat on the opposite side.

Another stretch is popular among pregnant and postpartum women, according to Thompson.

Half Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch With Reach

In this article, we will be discussing the Half Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch With Reach. This is a great stretch for the hip flexors, and it can be performed with or without resistance. We will go over how to perform the stretch, as well as some of the benefits.

The Half Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch With Reach is a great way to stretch the hip flexors. It can be performed with or without resistance, and it is a good way to increase flexibility and range of motion. The stretch helps to improve circulation and joint health, and it can also help to reduce stress and tension.

  1. Begin in a half-kneeling position with one knee on the ground and the other leg in front with bent knee at 90 degrees and foot planted on the ground directly under knee.
  2. During your breaststroke stroke, let forward knee glide forward while slowly driving your hips forward until you feel a stretch in the face. Squeeze your glutes and try not to arch your back.
  3. Extend your hands above your head and extend your body sideways to the side of your forward knee.
  4. Hold for 10 to 30 seconds while keeping the core tight.
  5. Slowly pull back to the starting position and down the arms of your body.
  6. Repeat on the opposite side.

Half Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch With Foot Elevated

The Half Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch with Foot Elevated is a great way to improve hip flexion and glute activation. This stretch can be performed with or without resistance. To perform the stretch, kneel on one knee with the other foot elevated on a bench, box, or chair. Gently lean forward until you feel a stretch in the front of your hip. Hold for 20-30 seconds and then repeat on the other side.

  1. Begin in a half-kneeling position with one foot on an elevated surface (like a chair or box) and the other foot placed on the ground. Place the other leg in front with bent knee and the foot resting in the same place as the first. Place hands on top of hips.
  2. Core tight, chest high, and hips squared, let forward knee glide forward while gently moving your hips forward until you feel a stretch in the front of your hip. Do not arch your back, and squeeze the glutes during the movement.
  3. Hold the stretch for 10 to 30 seconds while maintaining the core taut. Return to starting position.
  4. Repeat on the opposite side.

Butterfly Stretch

Butterfly stretch is a yoga pose that helps to open the chest and hips while stretching the inner thighs. This pose is typically done seated with your legs stretched out in front of you. To get into the pose, start by sitting up tall with your spine straight. then, bend your knees and bring your feet together so that the soles of your feet are touching. Place your hands on the floor behind you, then press down into your hands as you lift your hips up towards the sky. Keep your spine straight and hold for 5-10 breaths.

  1. Sit up with your knees bent and your feet drawing together in front of you.
  2. According to your core's tight and chest high, position your elbows on the inner knees. Gently squeeze down into the leg until the stretch goes through the inner thigh and into the groin.
  3. Hold the stretch for at least 10 to 30 seconds while maintaining your core tight.
  4. Slowly release the stretch by lifting the elbows from the knees

Dynamic Hip Flexor Stretching Routine

Start dynamically stretching your whole body before you get into your workout routine. Stretching dynamic stretches before a workout will improve blood flow to the area and warm-up the muscles so that they are prepared to move similarly to the way that you'll be moving during the workout. A high hip flexor range of motion can allow you to achieve greater speed, power, or strength during exercise.

Frog Stretch

There are many different types of stretches that can be done before or after a workout, and each has its own benefits. One such stretch is the frog stretch. The frog stretch is a great way to open up your hips and groin, and it's especially beneficial for runners and cyclists who spend a lot of time in those positions. To do the frog stretch, simply squat down with your feet wider than shoulder-width apart, then lean forward and touch your elbows to the ground. Hold the position for 30 seconds to a minute, then repeat on the other side.

  1. Start on all fours, hands directly under the shoulders, knees directly under the hips.
  2. Linger at your core and slowly drive the hips back, letting your arms extend forward and the chin to drop down in line with your collarbone.
  3. As you gently push your knees back into the floor, stretch your inner thigh and groin.
  4. Hold for 5 to 10 seconds while keeping core tight.
  5. Slowly release stretch by pulling hips back to starting position.
  6. Repeat for 10 reps.

Kneeling Adductor Stretch

Do you spend a lot of time sitting in a chair at work? Do you ever feel tightness in your hips and inner thighs? If so, the kneeling adductor stretch may be a good stretch for you to try. This stretch is simple to do and can be performed almost anywhere.

  1. Put one's hands directly under the shoulders and knees directly under the hips to begin. Extend one leg to the side.
  2. Engage core and slowly drive the hips back, allowing the arms to extend forward and the chin to drop off in line with collarbone.
  3. As your hips go back to the starting point, keep your leg closely extended and your pelvis lowered toward the floor until you feel a stretch in your inner thigh and groin.
  4. Hold for 5 to 10 seconds while keeping core tight.
  5. Repeat for 10 reps. Repeat on other side.

World’s Greatest Stretch

The world's greatest stretch is an exercise that is said to provide a host of health benefits. The exercise is simple enough, consisting of a forward bend followed by a spinal twist. The stretch is said to help improve flexibility, posture, and circulation. Additionally, the stretch helps to relieve tension in the upper body and neck.

  1. Start with hands and knees so hands are directly under shoulders and knees are directly under hips.
  2. Bring your left leg ahead and your left knee bent at 90 degrees, feet touching the floor directly beneath your knees.
  3. Keep your right arm on the ground and bend your left arm.
  4. Bring bent elbow to ankle tattoo on the left leg. Glide elbow up along the inner shin past knee and begin to rotate through torso while extending arm. Reach back behind you, allowing back knee to slowly rise from the ground.
  5. Hold for 5 to 10 seconds while keeping core tight.
  6. Repeat for 10 reps.

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